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Black History Month – We spoke to local resident Amoy from Yum Yums Caribbean Cuisine

As part of Black History Month, we sat down and had a chat with Oldhamer Amoy Lindo, the mastermind behind Yum Yums Caribbean Cuisine.

As part of Black History Month, we sat down and had a chat with Oldhamer Amoy Lindo, the mastermind behind Yum Yums Caribbean Cuisine.

The business, located on the High Street outside Primark, has been a staple for Caribbean food in the town since 2013. Selling everything from Jamaican Jerk Chicken and Peppered Steak to Curries and Dumplings.

Amoy started her journey into the world of food after adapting family recipes passed down from her mum and father-in-law. Amoy would do outside catering for local community groups such as Groundwork and Positive Steps while continuing to complete her University studies.

The budding entrepreneur completed a Business Management degree, then topped it up to gain a second degree with Honors in Business Management with Finance and Marketing graduating at Huddersfield University, Oldham Campus.

“Once I completed University, I decided to take the plunge and go full-time. Our first proper event was the first Christmas Market on the High Street, and I remember I was buzzing with excitement from it all.”

“It was a lot of hard work. I put in a lot of hours to get the recipes right and get the business off the ground”, Amoy said.

Amoy credits her family for the recipes that are sold in Oldham to her loyal customers who come from far and wide to taste Yum Yums food every Friday and Saturday.

“My mum is from St Kits (Caribbean) and my dad is from St Elizabeth (Jamaica) – they came over in the sixties, fell in love, and got married.

“When my mum used to make the Jerk Chicken, it was milder than it is now. People like a bit of a kick with their chicken these days – I try and add a little extra spice.”

When asked about what she loves most about her culture, Amoy said:

“Food and music – they go hand in hand with each other. I remember when I was younger, our house was like a hub for the whole family and every Sunday my mum would cook a traditional meal for us all, we’d listen to music and dance. It was the place to be and everyone got looked after.”

Amoy thinks one of the biggest misconceptions about the black culture is just ‘understanding the culture’. “I think people think we’re a bit alien sometimes, especially if they haven’t grown up with someone who’s black, or hasn’t spent any time in our space”.

Yum Yums is open every Friday and Saturday at the High Street Market – don’t miss out!

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